Review: Death Thieves by Julie Wright

Posted November 11, 2016 by Lillian in Reviews / 2 Comments

I received this book via I Am a Reader. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of this review.

Review: Death Thieves by Julie WrightDeath Thieves by Julie Wright
Published by Kindle Press on 2016-07-12
Length: 292 pages
Reviewing eARC from I Am a Reader
Rating:
Reading Challenges: 2016 Dystopia Reading Challenge, 2016 New Release Challenge

You're dead, Summer Dawn Rae.

When Summer Rae is stolen from the moment of her own death and taken to a future where mankind is dying, it is with the hope that she, and other teenagers like her, can save it. But after only a short time in the future, Summer discovers a darker side to the altruistic reasons behind her abduction. She is determined to fulfill her purpose in a world gone literally mad, but can an ordinary girl save a whole world when she only cares about saving one person?

Death Thieves by Julie Wright is an interesting and unique take on the dystopian trope. Summer Dawn Rae living her life one day at a time in foster care with her twin sister when she is ripped from a car accident that should have killed her and taken to save an unknown future.

Summer is an easy to like character. While she makes rash decisions, she ultimately puts her sister’s needs first. She describes herself as the heat to Winter’s cool. Their names really reflect their personalities. Summer is outgoing, rebellious, and doesn’t take orders well. When a soldier from the future saves her from her death, she fights him. She wants to stay in her own time stream and live with the only family she knows. You have to admire her for that. She’s great at causing trouble 😉

The story revolves around this unknown future, a future where the human population is dying off due to a mutated STI/STD that causes them to be sterile. Summer is taken at the moment of her death so as not to disrupt the past and brought to the future to be a “New Youth.” Basically her and many others are there to breed and repopulate without the mutated infection. Obviously rebellious Summer is all for helping….NOT. It’s interesting story, yet the plot moves at a very slow pace until about the 60% mark. Don’t get me wrong. It’s still an interesting read, just takes a little while to get into the story.

Overall I enjoyed this unique take on time travel and dystopia. Summer is an interesting character as she tries to fit into this new society and get back to her sister. If you enjoy science fiction and dystopia, I recommend you pick up a copy for yourself!

About Julie Wright

Julie Wright (1972-still breathing) was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. She's lived in LA, Boston, and the literal middle of nowhere (don't ask). She wrote her first book when she was fifteen. Since then, she's written sixteen novels and coauthored three. Julie won the Whitney award for best romance in 2010 with her novel Cross My Heart and the Crown Heart award for The Fortune Café. She is agented by Sara Crowe at Harvey Klinger Inc.

She has one husband, three kids, two salamanders, one dog, and a varying amount of fish (depending on attrition).

She loves writing, reading, traveling, hiking, playing with her kids, and watching her husband make dinner.

She used to speak fluent Swedish, but now speaks only well enough to cuss out her children in public.

She hates mayonnaise.


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2 responses to “Review: Death Thieves by Julie Wright

  1. Oh huh, that’s a really interesting concept for a book! I’m glad you explained it a bit more since the blurb sounded kind of generic. But really, I can’t blame her for being rebellious, I wouldn’t want to be brought to some other time and forced to breed and repopulate either! Great review 🙂
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